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of our operating revenue from membership dues f. you're not a member of the society, please join us or renew your membership today. i should note that anyone who joins or renews a membership today will receive a free autographed copy of our keynote speaker's new book, the title of which is martin's dream: my journey and the legacy of martin luther king, jr. we have a terrific program planned for you today. of course, the heart of the program will be our speaker, will be the remarks of our keynote speaker dr. claiborne parson. you have a program in front of you -- with you, and we will be following the program. we do have a number of members of the city's official family here with us today. the list of which i don't have and the number of community dignitaries. i see that we do have supervisor scott wiener, supervisor president of the board of supervisors david chiu, president cisneros, barbara garcia is with us. naomi is going to be part of the program. naomi kelly is with us, kim brandon from the port commission is with us, and a number of others. i'll be getting a list, i'll be ab
of aluminum. it's lightweight. that's the advantage. it's used for service conduits to take up the power from pg&e down to the meter. >> so on the outside of buildings sometimes you'll have the wires coming over from pg&e. >> the service drop. >> and i brought something called -- >> a weather head. >> weather head. here it is. >> so at the top you have the weather head. and the conductors come into the service drop. >> look at the front of the weather head. you see these little knockouts here. you knock it out and you run your service conductors. >> and the conductors go down the pipe. >> in san francisco we have special requirements for service entrance equipment because of the corrosive marine environment. right? >> that's correct. >> so what are some of our special local requirements? >> well, we require the conduit to either be aluminum rigid conduit or galvanized steel conduit. both of them, galvanized or aluminum, they are resis tonight corrosion. pg & e also has a rule, inch and a quarter minimum if they're going to attach the service drop to the conduit. because of that the standard m
in copenhagen, the status of the car has changed. people are not used to having cars anymore. they sometimes use a car and go to a car sharing club or something. it is socially acceptable to cycle. 30, 40 years ago, you would maybe be seen as a loser if he came on a bicycle, -- if you came on a bicycle, but now it is for everybody. everyone is cycling. it is not, the former generation in the 60's, denmark, they could afford to buy a car and they really enjoyed it. they wanted to show it, and all trips they made or made by cars, the the new generation has a completely different view. >> i already gave my answer during my presentation. it is everything, especially if it is business or businessmen, it is money driven. show it is comparative in cost or it is less cost for business. because if you show that, there is a discussion. >> let me ask before i go to the next question, what in your experience the you believe was the most influential and excepting the different stages of the car and its role in the city? i am sure over 40 years, your attitudes toward the automobile have changed. what do you b
and would supply a 200-amp panel board. >> how big does it have to be for 400? >> two sets. or you can use something called 500 which is a conductor twice as big as this. >> hard to work with. >> you have the choices in installing. two sets of these or one set of 500's. >> when somebody orders this grounding electrode, how much do they usually order? >> by national code, we need 20 feet. >> 20 feet has to be buried. >> in the rebar. we need 20 feet. so whatever we need longer, we can cut extra. >> so 20 feet plus what it takes to get. >> whatever they want to. >> cut us off a little bit. >> david, let's talk about energy efficiency. i know fluorescent lights and bulbs are a big issues right now. people are changing old-style fluorescent bulbs. what's the old one, the new one and the savings? >> the standard of the industry were t-12. this was a four-foot lamp. the 12 stands for and and it's about four or five times more efficient than the typical incandescent light bulb. in the energy to increase energy efficiency. they have a more efficient standard. it's a two footer. it's called the t-8
to provide us with this -- has been very kind to provided us with this opportunity to have four of their european experts in bicycle planning, bicycle implementation and bicycle programs and they are experts on all aspects of the bicycle. and here in san francisco, you know, we are at this point trying to after a hiatus of three years because of court-ordered injunctions trying to implement our bike plan. so we all a collective goal, i believe, to increase the environmental and nick sustainability of the world around us that we participate in and especially in san francisco, but we do have a special responsibility because this place provides us with the opportunity that most other places don't. the geometry and geography of san francisco is up that it is easier for us being in a city of short trips to veil ourselves to other alternatives to the car. so when we want to reclaim the street and the public right-of-way and the public realm for people and basic human needs of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places whe
will be on the down-low, so you have my blessing. if i may ask all to join us and make a toast to the future. >> don't count. one, two, three. very nice. very nice. >> need some help? >> cheers. >> we will be available for questions. thank you very much. >> the garden contains plants referred to by william shakespeare's plays and poems. located near the academy of sciences, shakespeare's garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring and wild flower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil little garden tucked behind the path of a charming rot iron gate with romantic magic. the overarching cherry trees, the gorgeous big walkway and brick wall, the benches, the rustic sun dial. the pack picnic, lovely bench, enjoy the sunshine and soft breeze and let the much. >> i want to welcome everybody. i'm from kiss fm and the voice of your san francisco giants at the park. we've got to great program planned for you today and keep that energy up. and thank you to lincoln high school. this is going to be a very exciting day as mayor lee and the giants kickoff the campaign. it is our goal along
to shut this off. we use it for cooking, eating and hot water. there were 40,000 people that called pg and e about their gas. that means they call turned off their gas? did they need to do that? when do you have to? when there is a problem. how long did you think it takes pg and e to get out and turn it back on? 45,000 people. days weeks, may be a month. who has seen this in the streets. a lot of muck is in there is it's full of dirt and weeds you turn it to the right to tighten it and left to loosen it. your home work you have to look at your house, pop open the lid, look in there see what's going on in there it's not nice and clean like this. who has seen this around their house? everybody. each meter has a shut off. you want to find out where your gas meter is. you can keep track of your usage but you will know how to shut it off. here's the shut off. i have some tools up here, you can look at these. any hardware store has these. they fit on this and it allows you to turn off the gas. when we talk about the wheels it's these on top. if you have a broken pipe. they will spin like mad
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
are local and jobs are local. each of us each day can fix the neighborhood. real progress is credit place specific and - this concreteness is one of the benefits of college track. it lift up one student after another it looks after and supports individuals. it stands or falls on the local individual concrete attention. there is nothing global about it's on the difference even though we believe that other institutions like ours with help the world. slowly we partially we build out. we're great deal of that mayor lee has chosen to make his first state of the city address here. it sends a message for all student in san francisco. you know that this city's future don't understand on the education we provide for all our children. it's with great pleurisy introduce the mayor of the city of san francisco. good morning thank you laura republican for that kind introduction and thank you for opening your divorces to me this morning. i want to honor david and all your supervisors and to our two newest supervisors. mayor brown thank you for being here and taking the time to join us this morning. you
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
programs. we are here to learn more from one of the resident artists. welcome to the show, deborah. tell us how this program began 20 years ago. >> the program began 20 years ago. our founder was an environmentalist and an activist and an artist in the 1970's. she started these street sweeping campaigns in the city. she started with kids. they had an exhibition at city hall. city officials heard about her efforts and they invited her to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging
us on behalf of all of the bay area team members that work at wells fargo the 25,000 of us. i have to tell you that we all thank the heros for their dedication to this community. the two men that we are going to honor today, display incomparable dedication to improving the mission neighborhood by helping former gang members and vulnerable use get on the right track. after nearly seven years on the police force san francisco police officers john coffee and david san's mission state and is gang enforcement officers became frustrated by the cycle of violence they witnessed permeated in the gang culture of san francisco. the officers developed an outreach program in 2010 to help secure jobs for young men in an effort to chem then from participating in gang life. so now, i'm going to tell you a story that will relate to me that shows the special kind of individuals i'm talk about and how they helped a young man named carlos. the officers have seen carlos hanging out with gang members and suspected that he might be involved in a elicit activities around the mission areas after warnin
on to find out, okay, this is the application we need to use for this surface and this is the, you know, a different application we need to use for another surface? and how can you prevent that ghosting? because if it's still there, it's there. just because you remove the pigment doesn't mean that it's gone. and like you stated yourself, when do you say, enough is enough? because if you have an historic building and you want the graffiti removed but you have the ghost there, is it really removed? >> well, historic buildings, dpw would not be removing the graffiti. and remember also on private property, the property owner is responsible for it. dpw as a rule does not do the abatement. so, whether they are or aren't using the correct materials to remove it off of brick, it's based on who they hire or who they get to do the work. we are aware for the time when we did do t we have several different products based on the type of surface. and staff was trained at that time, but that's when we were doing abatement on private property. >> i can just help a little bit. again, from the historic b
carrying a pail of water to put out the fire will not put out the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6,
significantly. i used to get two calls a week of people complaining about the bylaw, i don't get any of it now because we're able to defuse it by telling them about the support programs. i've been talking all afternoon. we also offer two mural programs, one that we fund ourselves directly and one that we offer community groups $2,000 to paint murals in the community. the idea is that that program is a matching program so community groups can match up to $2,000 with any type of community effort so they can get an artist to donate the art work, you can get somebody to donate paint, their volunteer hours count against the matching, so all of that is helpful in terms of getting them going. and what we really found is that some groups will use the two thousand and spend 12,000 on doing a mural. the best one i've seen, we had a high school do two dugouts that were constantly being hit, it cost them $750 and we have no problem with the dugouts any more. public awareness, we have a very, very substantial public awareness campaign. we have media support from all of our local radio, television and
. (applause) >> but we also have tremendous help from people who are helping us create the policies and the accountability in all the different departments. melva davis, kim brandon, willie adams at the port, chuck collins, [speaker not understood], the reverend amos brown, denise tyson, linda richardson, sonya harris, patricia thomas, veronica honeycut, these are just the names of a few of our commissioners who are heading up those very important divisions of our city. and they are joining with me and with the supervisors and with the department heads to do what mrs. obama asked us to do. whenever we occupy these public positions throughout the city or throughout the state or throughout the nation, we do the right thing, we keep the doors of opportunity open and enriched for everybody else. and we're already seeing it happen. yesterday i was at the luncheon for the boys and girls club, wonderful, wonderful entity that's reaching out to all of our young high school kids and make sure they're motivated to go to college. you should have heard them talk about their futures. you should
our very own first lady, mrs. anita lee. i see a number of other dignitaries who are here with us today. council general gao and council general hawk of china and singapore. and to our many department heads who are here. we have harlen kelly with puc and mrs. kelly, the city administrator. and chief white. and we have our recorder, nu nguyen and the mayor's office of housing. there are a number of other commissioners here as well. i want to recognize, i did see rodney fung and mrs. riley in the crowd. and to the many others here, thank you for joining with us today. and so this is our ninth annual city hall lunar new year celebration. i am feel honored to welcome you here today. for years san francisco has been a shining example of how we get things done together. and not only have folks from asian-american community and from all walks of life. san francisco is truly a melting pot. we want to celebrate our lunar new year and hope for a prosperous new year. and my new role as assessor, we hope that is true. rather than dragging out this presentation. i want to bring up to speak a n
. and congratulations to the whole police department. continue to do the best you can. and keep us the world-class status that we are. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, mayor lee for those very kind words. our next speaker is one of our very well respected police commission commissioners. commissioner susie loftus. >> thank you, everyone. on behalf of the san francisco police commission, president tippy tip tippy mazzucco and it's my great privilege to honor this day of your leadership. and not only the guys and women on the front row. but everyone who here. your families. if i can take a moment and thank you on behalf of the commission. for the sacrifice that we know you make every day. you lend us your loved ones. your family to go out and keep this city safe. and it's appreciated. and on days like today when we recognize these officers and deputy chiefs. this is your day. this is your accomplishment. because no one does anything alone. thank you for what you have done to make this day possible for them. and to the ladies and gentlemen on the front rows. what i want to say to y
has something here that you guys can all use. different types of buildings are in the city. we have wood, unreinforced masonry, you have high rise and you have tilt ups. what's the safest construction type to be? four stories or less. wood? yeah, wood framed building. why is wood the safest building to be in, 4 stories or less? it flexes, yeah, it's flexible. what's the danger here? chimney, yeah, fireplace. be aware of the fact that just because it's a wood building and the event caused some sort of compromise of the structure of the building and the building is still standing doesn't necessarily mean there's not a danger there. so what could you as nert's do to make that situation better or at least keep it the same so no one else gets hurt? keep it off, yeah. keep people away. perfect. take out some of that yellow tape that you have, that yellow caution tape, and string it around around keep people back. in this particular case, what could you do to make that situation better? turn off the gas. where would you turn the gas off at? at the street, okay. that's a good place to do it
liability. when i hear about cycling in the u.s., people say, oh, but cycling is so dangerous. and then we say, no, cycling is not dangerous. cyclists hardly ever cause accidents. cars cause accidents. cars cause facilities and in the netherlands we have the philosophy that car drivers should realize that they're in a machine that can kill. and also from that on responsibility in taking liability. if a car drives over a child on a bike, no matter what happens, he is 100% liable for whatever happens. and even in the other cases, when a car goes in the collision with an adult on a bike, still there is at least 50% liability for the car driver. and when the car driver would say, but yeah, the cyclists made a very strange movement. then we would say in the netherlands, well, you know that's about cycling. so you should reduce your speed when you see the cycling, you just can't drive on with 40 or 45 miles an hour alongside cyclists because there is always the risk that something strange happens so that's important. jurisdiction. there were initiatives to put in a code, but there was large oppo
and opportunity after all are at the heart of the this place the idea we call san francisco. you know, many of us came here from smoip else or their parents did. and whether it was guadalajara or a rural county in texas what brought us here was that hope where in san francisco as most places offered a better life. it was judged by a play we create not by a language we grew up with. we're a city that rewards the inno matter and the risktaker. fred and harvey ye very and willie brown and nancycy pelosi. we've known our share of adversity, earthquake and the problems with aids. we're not afraid to fail or doing what we know is right. and most importantly we know that none of us succeed alone whether it's in reconcile or business or life. we know as michelle obama said so well, this past summer when you walk through that door of opportunity you don't slam it shut you help someone else walk through that door behind you. my fellow san franciscans i know there's no limit to the opportunities in this city in we keep the door open. if we commit ourselves and put politics behind us we can help future gener
of open space with the transit tower at its center piece. along the waterfront the mixed use development with the san francisco giants at c-3 lot will create vibrant new neighborhoods. and in less than 5 years we'll workman's compensation the golden state wares. a crumpling appear for parked cars will be transformed into a new arena bringing people closer to the waterfront and creating good jobs and year-round jobs. it will a be a short walk along the waterfront. leakage those kinds of opportunities attacking on a mba france should i say and privately finance and building a new facility on your water front only come once in a lifetime. we have a obligation to always put our people first and we must have the best opportunity for building all the facilities we need. i think that we have looerdz who are attentive to the neighbors and the public. well this is a partisanship that's meant to last. i look forward to doing this right. and sees this extraordinary opportunity. and as you can see our opportunity is not just think building it's about the international events we attract. and childre
loved ones if you want you can go help out other people in your city. there it is, a place for us to gather as nert members and there's our nert ics area. here is our structure. same kind of set up, sort of our version. command policy section, the planning group, they are up on top. then once things get rolling, you have your operations section, logistics section. here are our objectives on the nert team, figure out if it's big, if it's small, how do we keep track of what's going on? do we just remember it? are we going to rely on our computers, our pc's? no, we have to write it down the old-fashioned way. address, is there a fire, yes or no, damage, are there people injured, dead, can you get there. where, what, any sort of damage, are there people involved, can you get to it? here is a nert status sheet. basically if you send somebody out, you want to send the members' names, what time they went out, when they came back, what the assignment was, any comments, and if you have an incident number that would be nice. who is the safety person? we don't want to send people out, just h
year, which makes sense we only had a 1.5 decrease in the amount of graffiti. it does tell us that the taggers are moving around from one neighborhood to the next, telling us how we should be managing or programs or which neighborhoods we should be looking at. this is a graphic analysis of the neighborhoods. i don't have a pointer, i'll get my head out of the way. downtown was one of our key problem areas that we started out with but we're seeing a steady decline in the downtown core. so basically we have been focusing a lot of our programming in the downtown area. we had a huge decrease in the gardineau neighborhood in the second year but something has happened in that neighborhood to pop it back up. so it's allowing us to look neighborhood by neighborhood to look at the community enforcement officers woork they are doing there so next year when we go to do a hire, our bylaw officers are working with revitalization, i'll be sharing this information with them to say these are the key neighborhoods you need to be in touch with as well as the different constables and beat off
in the city and congratulations to the foundation for your wonderful work congratulations to all of us nobody has got it better than us in san francisco congratulations everyone. (applause) . i don't ladies and gentlemen, please welcome to the stage grace davis, director of california corporate affairs intell corporation ... >>> okay with today being valentine's day we are thrilled to help present 13 new heart art works we see these hearts all around san francisco, reminding us that the general is the heart of our city these hearts generate we have a remarkable roster of artist and is this year is no exception and please join me in welcoming to the stage this year's heart artist and in 2013, heart artists are linda at vino. chai davis ... (applause) tara g i f ra,, wendy gold hearts of letters ... natalie guy command are hearts natalie is not able to join us today. brick hoard heart of the giants. >> and which has been defined by the members of the 2012 championship scenes. >> -that is okay we can have another applause. robert night english heart 2.. >> mary an doors yes, i amia on
. we are still a small company. and knew that such an undertaking could be overwhelming for us. fortunately the support that we found from others was overwhelming too. everyone took on a can-do attitude. and i would like to extend my enormous gratitude to the ports and to the mayor's office for their help in getting us here today. and also to our friends the giants that value san francisco icons. these reflect the heart and soul of the city towards anchor. and for that i would like to thank all the people of san francisco for the huge support of their city's brewery. pier 48 will ensure our capacity and secure anchor's future. beyond the brewery we want san francisco to be a must-see traction to locals and visitors ali alike. adding to that we will have restaurants and museums. we are less well known for our pioneered history for brewing. and our capacity with pier 48 allows both brewing and distilling. we envision in the rock mission development that will take advantage of the water commerce with materials coming in and exports going out. where people can wander around peering
, and it has its own beauty, but you have to get beyond what you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants, but our landscapes are still lush and use about 30% of what the subtropical landscape with turf would use. las vegas has adopted a drought tolerant ordinance. we're using less water today than we used five years ago, despite over 300,000 new residents. i think it's a pretty amazing example as to how a town can really turn on a dime if there's the political will and if the public gets behind it. narrator: even the casinos and resorts have adapted to efficient water use. mulroy: the las vegas strip uses only 3% of all the
importantly, let us dance tonight for those who still need to find the courage to leave abusive relationships and seek help. and i will keep rising and i hope you do, and i will keep demanding. and i will keep dancing until every woman and girl in san francisco can live free and clear of violence. say it with me. i rise. thank you. >> there are so many cases, and many that occur in the world. one out of three will be raped and abused. one billion women dancing is for revolution. and we have men here, thank you. one billion rising is a global call to action. and one billion rising is a celebration. this is how we celebrate the help that all of those women can receive from all of us. we can do something and we can only do it together. right now i am going to introduce janice. she's a missionary. she's an activist. she's a leader and she's a poet. she will read a poem from eve ensler. who started with this movement, she started collecting situations, and experiences. and memories of so many women around the world and she created the vagina monologues, and that led to this. >> thank you. hey, you
[speaking foreign language] please join us for refreshments. .... >> >> i am here to tell you that one billion rising is the biggest global action on the planet for ending violence against women and girls. today in 203 country, one billion rising is dancing up the will of the world to end violence against women and girls once and for all. we have expanded our list that the u.n. recognized of countries, and how your response has been through this call. together we will make it so that this issue is never marginalized again. san francisco, you have been rising all day long. from dancing across the golden gate bridge this morning. the dancers who were just here now at grace cathedral. and thank you grace cathedral for welcoming us. and elrio will be dancing all night long. what better place to rise and here at city hall on valentine's day and all the elected officials and leaders, all of the women of anti-violence leaders who are here, and are doing this work everyday alongside of you. thank you, san francisco rising. v-day is a welcome place and i spoke to the representative from congo.
were involved just besides us and i think if you look back at what really went on in the playoffs we made a decision when we were detain 2 games from the cincinnati reds. we had an easy decision to make. it would have been pretty easy to give up. i remember we heard on the radio that there was no way the 70 giepts were going to win. well, we decided to make a decision we weren't going to play four ourselves we were going to play for each other. we didn't care if with had to win a hundred games we were going to win that day. it's the same challenge we ask i. there's a decision everyday between what's right. and what's easy. it's easy to look away but i've been in a lot of cities and san francisco is one of the most beautiful places i've ever been in my life. i absolutely love it here he every time i go to the park i'm so happy. you can't compare it to anywhere. you guys are spoiled. it's beautiful. by at the end of the day let's keep san francisco beautiful and clean. and let's do this ever day and let's get this win >> come on we can do better than the that. the second-graders fr
that is being held here. i think it's important for us to recognize there a difference between those of the ages of 18-25, and someone that is older or someone that is below. the criminal justice system doesn't always recognize the difference. i can tell you if we look at a study that has been done. and like the u.k. or look deeply in the process of younger people. and the reality that there is a role to the social development of the age group between 18-25. and the fact involved and the psychological world has recognized this long ago. but the criminal justice system has not. and to address the solution and do in a thoughtful way to avoid incarceration and the impact of this young life is important. i think here in san francisco, we are in a long way of other communities recognizing the need to do this. and working with the young people to reduce incarceration and to involve the right services. i am excited about this. and i want you to take away one other piece. but the british are further away in this area, because they have spent the money and resources to look at this more deeply. but accor
products. narrator: agriculture and industry use roughly 80% of the water consumed in the united states. water is the basis for manufacturing many goods and provides the ability to clean and sterilize everything from computer chips to the surgical instruments used in hospitals. kelly: the minute that there's not enough water for businesses, industry, and individuals, they have to go elsewhere. and when they go elsewhere, jobs go elsewhere. your entire economy begins to suffer with the lack of clean water. narrator: while the water infrastructure provides for our health, safety, and economy, a growing concern is that the value society derives from water has not traditionally been reflected in the price we pay for water. man: when you take a look at how much people pay for water, as a percentage of median household income, it's usually less than 1%. and when you compare that to how much we pay for electricity and gas, cable tv, and internet, the bottom line is, in the united states, we don't pay a heck of a lot for water. curtis: at an average cost of about $2.50 for 1,000 gallons of tap
, eye protection, and masks and sanitation and hand washing and who among us don't have a nick or a cut on their hand and are you going to touch someone's blood and your in tac skin will protect you from most ilknows. however, if you have a cut on your hand you have a path for infection to get inside of you and you want a pair of latex gloves -- several pairs of glo gloves that you can put on and change as you go from patient t patient hopefully and at least wash your hands and disinfect your hands between patient contacts and the eyes are like an open wound and path to get into your body and glasses and take the old glasses and throw them in your kit and you have something to wear and face mask and of course dust and dirt and all of these disasters throw up dust and dirt and especially in a dryer season and push comes t shove a band da bandana. and after a disaster is not the time to let your hygiene slip and it's a time to tighten it u and communitycable diseases and if it's wet and not yours don't touch it. gloves and every patient contac and don't touch blood and it's good rule to l
ending than that, but i am going to use my chance just to ask one last question. do you believe that you have marked fashion history? >> it is difficult to say. is it my purpose? i do not know. i think that's everybody is marking fashion history in a way. as much as journalists because they show the people. what is fashion history? some old clothes that you can find may be in the free-market? books, magazines, newspapers? i think that i am part of that, but to think that me, i'm mark -- i do not think so. it is not exactly my purpose. it really seems very selfish to do what you love. >> i'm glad i managed more or less to silence you with my question. [laughter] i would like to say that i believe you have marked fashion history in the best way by creating clothes, which have been a mirror to society as it changed and as it happened, and you will be known for that as much as for the beauty of the close. thank you so much for giving us the chance to talk to you. [applause] test, test, test, test, test, test >> well, thank you all for coming. it's great. i just want to highlight the program
vandal because that can be of huge use to you. meetings, we hold a monthly task force meeting and our task force meeting pretty much covers everything from santa barbara down to san diego is our main group we have a task force meeting with. we share ideas, it's evolved over the years, become more formal. now each time we have a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for about 6 months because it fell apart and
, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kind of a reflection of what is happening. also a reflection of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the
problem. that is not good for business. for us, it is active transport, really important as a solution for being accessible. ok, does it work? yes. this is the city. at the red lines, these are the congestion. this is the pattern of workers who go to work in the morning and in the afternoon. most of the workers come from outside of the city of amsterdam. they come mostly by car, but also a big part from public transport. what was the conclusion of all the businesses? if we go on like this, we have a real big problem in one, two years, maybe a little bit longer, we will not have any mobility anymore in our own region. that was one of the reasons that businesses came together and they were thinking, what can we do, not for a long time because it takes time, but what can we do today that helps today? that is important for the accessibility, and accessibility is very important for good, competition against the other regions in europe. of course, it is very important for the quality of life. if we want to attract international business, we need to attract people from outside. they only come
. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i want to show this girl which is different. does not know how to walk as a model. they have their own personality. i remember this year i was asking a professional model to walk to see if there were walking too much
stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i tell them whatever i know. my kno
grace cathedral for welcoming us. and elrio will be dancing all night long. what better place to rise and here at city hall on valentine's day and all the elected officials and leaders, all of the women of anti-violence leaders who are here, and are doing this work everyday alongside of you. thank you, san francisco rising. v-day is a welcome place and i spoke to the representative from congo. and i want to thank every person in the mayor's office and the
of us who are working it to make sure that san francisco has the most gem of neighborhoods for the entire word we're trying to chief that >> thank you for helping us. thank you very much >> thank you supervisor. and we know it's comfortable without our community leaders. so, please thank you so much. in our other vp thank you all for coming. i think the original reason for this conference is to tell you in terms of giving you a qualified data. we did a terrific study were what i want to talk to you today about why the cd vs good but in terms of how we change the environment it's more than just changing the city's atmosphere the real magic is because we do all these things but it changes the feeling people have a of a neighborhood it gives them a great sense of belonging. it's what cv ds are important. i want to thank supervisor wiener and the mayor because the atmosphere is very important >> i want to thank if you could say just a couple of words? well, thank you very much for coming out today. i want to thank the supervisors and thank you to lee a for leading the commun
for us and she won the contest for designing the logo for the conference. pretty nice design, i think. so, monica rose will be receiving an award for the designing of the logo. she designed the programs and she designed the brochures to promote the conference. and she's already said that she's on board donating it for the 2013 conference in phoenix. (applause) >> >> rick stanton nominated somebody. rick? * >> if you've been working in graffiti profession for awhile, i think everybody knows randy campbell. who knows randy campbell? that's good. those of you who don't, especially if you're in law enforce. you're probably going to want to write this down. no graph.net. randy campbell has been working in graffiti cases forever and he's a retired, i think, sheriff or highway patrolman. maybe somebody can help me out there. >> highway patrol. >> highway patrolman. what he runs it's no ground.net. for law enforcement, if you're looking for a tagger you think is crossing state boundaries and you catch one and you want to put up that person's tag to other law enforcement agencies, he's got a netwo
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